Blog

0

Lifting Programs: Week of 6.18.18

Week of 6.18.18

POWERLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Elevated deadlift (4” off ground): 5×3 building to heavy for the day
2) Front Squat: 4×2 building to heavy for the day
3a) Bench press: 6×2 @ 75% for speed
3b) Double KB front squat: 6×6-8 heavier than last week
4a) Single leg KB/DB RDL: 3×8 ea leg
4b) Banded lateral walk: 3×15 ea direction

Day 2:
1) Board press (one board): 5×3 building to heavy for the day
2) Strict press: 4×3 building to heavy for the day
3a) Sumo deadlift: 6×2 @ 75% for speed
3b) Seated single arm DB Arnold press: 6×4-5 ea arm heavier than last week
4a) Double DB Kang squat (DB’s resting on shoulders): 3×8
4b) Pronated DB reverse fly: 3×12 light/moderate

Day 3:
1a) Semi-supinated DB bench press: 4×4-5 heavier than last week
1b) Double DB supinated bent-over row: 4×10
1c) Narrow push-ups @ 20×0: 4×8-12 (modified if necessary)
2a) DB upright row: 4×8-10 heavy
2b) KB bicep curl: 4×8-10
3) Back squat + reverse lunge ea leg: 3×5 heavier than last week
4a) Rower pike-ups: 4×8-12
4b) Strict hanging leg raise: 4×8-12
5) Stretch

WEIGHTLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Power snatch + snatch, 1+2: 5 sets heavy across
2) Clean + front squat, 2+1: 5 sets heavy across
3) Back Squat: 5×3 heavy across
4a) Single leg KB/DB RDL: 3×8 ea leg
4b) Banded lateral walk: 3×15 ea direction

Day 2:
1) Clean + jerk, 1+3: 5 sets building heavier than last week
2) Strict press: 4×3 building to heavy for the day
3) Front Squat: 5×2 building to heavier than last week
4a) Double DB Kang squat (DB’s resting on shoulders): 3×8
4b) Pronated DB reverse fly: 3×12 light/moderate

Day 3:
1a) Semi-supinated DB bench press: 4×4-5 heavier than last week
1b) Double DB supinated bent-over row: 4×10
1c) Narrow push-ups @ 20×0: 4×8-12 (modified if necessary)
2a) DB upright row: 4×8-10 heavy
2b) KB bicep curl: 4×8-10
3) Back squat + reverse lunge ea leg: 3×5 heavier than last week
4a) Rower pike-ups: 4×8-12
4b) Strict hanging leg raise: 4×8-12
5) Stretch

0

A New, Concise Method for Setting and Tracking Goals

As we have previously discussed, setting effective goals can be tricky business. How do you define a goal in the simplest way possible? How do you create a system so that you can regularly see your goal, interact with it and think about it? How do ensure that you are making progress, how do you measure that progress over time and how do you hold yourself accountable along the way?

Making lists is a critical step here, but how do you make a list that is both concise and descriptive? In an ideal world, you should be able to run through a list of your short- and long-term goals quickly. It should be clear where you are progressing and where you are falling behind. There needs to be an easy and effective method to separate each goal while also painting the big picture and defining your long-term aspirations. We will use a simple, tricolor system to separate goals of varying lengths and timelines; the aim is to make it easy to compare where your short-term goals relate to your long-term goals and, thus, where to focus your daily efforts.

Much like a stoplight, we will separate our list of goals into green, yellow and red:

Green: green goals encompass two categories: short-term goals and daily, repeatable tasks. Short-term goals are things that you want to accomplish in the very near future. Maybe your deadline is one day, one week, maybe even one month at a stretch. These things are your low-hanging fruit; they should be relatively easy to accomplish and should relate directly to your long-term goals and aspirations. Your daily, repeatable tasks are also going to be your shortest term goals: these are things you must do every day, or every week, to stay on track and continue making progress. Hold yourself accountable to these! You will consult your green list every single day, because these are things that you must check off every day.

Yellow: the yellow list contains things that must be accomplished soon but not immediately. These will often be stepping-stones towards your long-term goals, prerequisites that must be accomplished in order for you to inch closer to the finish line. Yellow goals will require more focus and effort than green goals; you must metaphorically sweat a bit to accomplish these. In the end, however, these goals help build momentum and act as rungs on the ladder to success.

Red: this is your list of long-term goals, dreams and aspirations. Shoot for the stars here! Don’t hold back on your red list. These are the items that will lead to fulfillment and a deep sense of accomplishment. The goals on this list help provide the framework for the yellow and green items. All those ideas that others in your life tell you will “never happen” or you are “crazy” for pursuing belong here.

How do these three colors relate, and how do you most effectively utilize this list to your advantage? Everything trickles down from the long-term list to the short-term and daily list. Your red goals are what you see for yourself in the future; there is no limit to how distant these goals may be. From there, you must determine what yellow items are crucial stepping-stones to propel you from where you are now to where your red list defines as your final destination. Every big-picture idea has smaller, requisite pieces that compose the final image. Pick a handful of key action items on the path to your metaphorical finish line and place those items on your yellow list. From there, determine a list of short-term goals that will allow you to inch closer to one or more of your yellow items. These define your green list. You must also decide which actions you can take on a daily basis to make tangible, measurable progress on the other two lists. These items will also make up your green list.

As an example, imagine that your red goal is to be a New York Times bestselling author. From there, your yellow items might include: publishing a book, getting a literary agent, building a successful social media presence (defined as achieving X number of followers), and being recognized as an industry expert (maybe a certain magazine writes an article about you). All of these yellow items will, upon completion, vault you closer to your long-term goal. In order to accomplish these smaller tasks, you must come up with a meaningful list of actions you can take daily to make progress. These might include: writing something meaningful, interacting with current followers, reaching out to agencies, messaging successful blogs to do guest spots, reaching out to magazines for interview opportunities or attending networking events. All of these are actions that you can take daily, weekly or monthly which can help you make progress on the yellow items.

Your three lists must work symbiotically; the goal is for each list to provide goal-posts for items on the next list. This allows you to build momentum and make forward progress instead of spinning your wheels and staying in place. Remember that life is always moving: there is no such thing as standing still. You are either making meaningful steps forward or going backwards as life passes you by. Come up with your list today and refine it over time. Your goals and tasks may change and evolve as you start to accomplish things, and you may even find that certain goals cause you to redefine what you find important long-term. No matter what, take action today. There is nothing stopping you from making progress in a positive direction!

Until next time.

0

Lifting Programs: Week of 6.11.18

Week of 6.11.18

POWERLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Box squat (at or slightly above parallel): 5×3 building to heavier than last week
2) Sumo deadlift: 4×3 building to heavier than last week
3a) Strict press: 6×2 @ 85% for speed
3b) Double KB front squat: 6×8-10
4a) Single leg KB/DB RDL: 3×8 ea leg
4b) Banded lateral walk: 3×15 ea direction

Day 2:
1) Close-grip bench press: 5×3 building to heavier than last week
2) Push press: 4×3 building to heavier than last week
3a) Box squat (at or slightly above parallel): 6×2 @ 85% for speed
3b) Seated single arm DB Arnold press: 6×5 ea arm
4a) Glute-ham raise: 3×10-12
4b) Pronated DB reverse fly: 3×12 light/moderate

Day 3:
1a) Semi-supinated DB bench press: 4×4-6 heavier than last week
1b) Double DB supinated bent-over row: 4×10
1c) DB skull crusher: 4×10
2a) DB upright row: 4×8-10 heavy
2b) Single arm DB push press: 4×5-7 ea heavier than last week
3) Back squat + reverse lunge ea leg: 3×6 challenging
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :20-:30 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :45-:60)
4b) Strict hanging leg raise: 4×8-12
5) Stretch

WEIGHTLIFTING
Day 1:
1) 3-position snatch (hang, low hang, floor) + OH squat, 1+1: 5 sets heavy across
2) Clean pull + clean + front squat, 2+1+1: 5 sets heavy across
3) Box squat (at or slightly above parallel): 5×3 building to heavier than last week
4a) Single leg KB/DB RDL: 3×8 ea leg
4b) Banded lateral walk: 3×15 ea direction

Day 2:
1) Low hang clean + jerk, 1+3: 5 sets building
2) Push press: 4×3 building to heavier than last week
3) Front squat: 5×3 building to heavier than last week
4a) Glute-ham raise: 3×10-12
4b) Pronated DB reverse fly: 3×12 light/moderate

Day 3:
1a) Semi-supinated DB bench press: 4×4-6 heavier than last week
1b) Double DB supinated bent-over row: 4×10
1c) DB skull crusher: 4×10
2a) DB upright row: 4×8-10 heavy
2b) Single arm DB push press: 4×5-7 ea heavier than last week
3) Back squat + reverse lunge ea leg: 3×6 challenging
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :20-:30 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :45-:60)
4b) Strict hanging leg raise: 4×8-12
5) Stretch

0

Lifting Programs: Week of 6.4.18

Week of 6.4.18

POWERLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Box squat (at or slightly above parallel): 5×3 building to heavier than last week
2) Sumo deadlift: 4×3 building to heavier than last week
3a) Strict press: 6×2 @ 80% for speed
3b) DB/KB lunge: 6×10 (5 ea leg) heavy
4a) Single leg KB/DB RDL: 3×8 ea leg
4b) Banded lateral walk: 3×15 ea direction

Day 2:
1) Close-grip bench press: 5×3 building to heavier than last week
2) Push press: 4×3 building to heavier than last week
3a) Box squat (at or slightly above parallel): 6×2 @ 80% for speed
3b) DB floor press: 6×5-7 heavy
4a) Glute-ham raise: 3×10-12
4b) Banded press (band under feet and over hands): 3×25

Day 3:
1a) Semi-supinated DB bench press: 4×5-7 heavier than last week
1b) Double DB supinated bent-over row: 4×10
1c) DB skull crusher: 4×10
2a) DB upright row: 4×8-10 heavy
2b) Single arm DB push press: 4×6-8 ea heavy
3) Back squat: 3×8 @ 60% of new 1RM
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :20-:30 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :45-:60)
4b) Strict hanging leg raise: 4×8-12
5) Stretch

WEIGHTLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Hang snatch + low hang snatch + OH squat, 2+1+1: 5 sets heavy across
2) Clean pull + low hang clean + clean, 2+1+1: 5 sets heavy across
3) Box squat (at or slightly above parallel): 5×3 building to heavier than last week
4a) Single leg KB/DB RDL: 3×8 ea leg
4b) Banded lateral walk: 3×15 ea direction

Day 2:
1) Low hang clean + front squat + jerk, 1+1+2: 5 sets building
2) Push press: 4×3 building to heavier than last week
3) Front squat: 5×3 building to heavier than last week
4a) Glute-ham raise: 3×10-12
4b) Banded press (band under feet and over hands): 3×25

Day 3:
1a) Semi-supinated DB bench press: 4×5-7 heavier than last week
1b) Double DB supinated bent-over row: 4×10
1c) DB skull crusher: 4×10
2a) DB upright row: 4×8-10 heavy
2b) Single arm DB push press: 4×6-8 ea heavy
3) Back squat: 3×8 @ 60% of new 1RM
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :20-:30 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :45-:60)
4b) Strict hanging leg raise: 4×8-12
5) Stretch

0

Lifting Programs: Week of 5.28.18

Week of 5.28.18

POWERLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Box squat (at or slightly above parallel): 5×3 building to heavy for the day
2) Sumo deadlift: 4×3 building to heavy for the day
3a) Strict press: 6×2 @ 75% for speed
3b) DB/KB lunge: 6×8 (4 ea leg) heavy
4a) Barbell good-morning: 3×8 moderately heavy
4b) Banded lateral walk: 3×15 ea direction

Day 2:
1) Close-grip bench press: 5×3 building to heavy for the day
2) Push press: 4×3 building to heavy for the day
3a) Box squat (at or slightly above parallel): 6×2 @ 75% for speed
3b) Push-ups: 4×8-12 perfect (add deficit if you need to)
4a) Glute-ham raise: 3×10-12
4b) Banded press (band under feet and over hands): 3×25

Day 3:
1a) Semi-supinated DB bench press: 4×6-8 heavy
1b) DB bicep curl: 4×10
1c) DB skull crusher: 4×10
2a) DB hang snatch: 4×6-8 ea heavy
2b) Single arm DB push press: 4×6-8 ea heavy
3) Back squat: 3×9 @ 55% of new 1RM
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
4b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
5) Stretch

WEIGHTLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Hang snatch + OH squat, 3+1: 5 sets heavy across
2) Clean pull + clean, 3+1: 5 sets heavy across
3) Box squat (at or slightly above parallel): 5×3 building to heavy for the day
4a) Barbell good-morning: 3×8 moderately heavy
4b) Banded lateral walk: 3×15 ea direction

Day 2:
1) Hang clean + front squat + jerk, 1+1+2: 5 sets building
2) Push press: 4×3 building to heavy for the day
3) Front squat: 5×3 building to heavy for the day
4a) Glute-ham raise: 3×10-12
4b) Banded press (band under feet and over hands): 3×25

Day 3:
1a) Semi-supinated DB bench press: 4×6-8 heavy
1b) DB bicep curl: 4×10
1c) DB skull crusher: 4×10
2a) DB hang snatch: 4×6-8 ea heavy
2b) Single arm DB push press: 4×6-8 ea heavy
3) Back squat: 3×9 @ 55% of new 1RM
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
4b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
5) Stretch

0

Lifting Programs: Week of 5.21.18

Week of 5.21.18

POWERLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Back squat: Build to heavy single for the day
2) Bench press: Build to heavy single for the day
3a) DB pec fly: 4×8-10 light
3b) Band pull-apart: 4×15-20 light
4) Unweighted GHD back extension: 4×12

Day 2:
1) Deadlift: Build to heavy single for the day
2) Front squat: Build to heavy single for the day
3a) DB thruster: 4×8-10 moderate
3b) Push-ups: 4×8-12 perfect (add deficit if you need to)
4) GHD harop curl: 4×10-12

Day 3:
1) Strict press: Build to heavy single for the day
2a) Push press: 4×3 @ strict press max from today
2b) Single arm DB row: 4×6-8 ea arm heavier than last week
3) Back squat: 3×10 @ 50% of 1RM from this week
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
4b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
5) Stretch

WEIGHTLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Back squat: Build to heavy single for the day
2) Snatch: Build to heavy single for the day
3) Clean pull: 4×3 @ snatch weight from today
4) Unweighted GHD back extension: 4×12

Day 2:
1) Clean: Build to heavy single for the day
2) Jerk: Build to heavy single for the day
3) Front squat: Build to heavy single for the day
4) GHD harop curl: 4×10-12

Day 3:
1) Strict press: Build to heavy single for the day
2a) Push press: 4×3 @ strict press max from today
2b) Single arm DB row: 4×6-8 ea arm heavier than last week
3) Back squat: 3×10 @ 50% of 1RM from this week
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
4b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
5) Stretch

0

Lifting Programs: Week of 5.14.18

Week of 5.14.18

POWERLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Back squat: 4×3 lighter than last week
2) Bench press: 4×3 @ 65-70% of heaviest single from last week
3a) DB pec fly: 4×8-10 light
3b) DB front raise + lateral raise: 4x :30 same weight as pec fly continuous
4) Weighted GHD back extension: 4×10

Day 2:
1) Deadlift: 4×3 lighter than last week
2) Front squat: 4×3 @ 65-70% of heaviest single from last week
3a) DB/KB step-ups: 4x :30 challenging (alternating legs)
3b) Push-ups: 4×8-12 perfect (add deficit if you need to)
4) GHD harop curl: 4×10-12

Day 3:
1a) Bradford press (empty barbell): 4×8-10
1b) Single arm DB row: 4×6-8 ea arm moderate
1c) Supinated ring row: 4×8-10 perfect
2) Empty barbell back squat: 4x :30 continuous reps
3a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
3b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
4) Stretch

WEIGHTLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Snatch: 5×1 @ 75-80%
2) Clean: 5×1 @ 75-80%
3) Clean pull: 4×3 @ 90% of clean work from today
4) GHD back extensions: 4×10

Day 2:
1) Back squat: 4×3 lighter than last week
2a) Push press: 4×1 lighter than last week
2b) Push-ups: 4×8-12 perfect (add deficit if you need to)
3) Front squat + jerk, 1+1: 4 sets lighter than last week
4a) DB pec fly: 4×8-10 light
4b) DB front raise + lateral raise: 4x :30 same weight as pec fly continuous
5) GHD harop curl: 4×10-12

Day 3:
1a) Bradford press (empty barbell): 4×8-10
1b) Single arm DB row: 4×6-8 ea arm moderate
1c) Supinated ring row: 4×8-10 perfect
2) Empty barbell back squat: 4x :30 continuous reps
3a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
3b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
4) Stretch

0

Lifting Programs: Week of 5.7.18

Week of 5.7.18

POWERLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Back squat: 4×4 @ 65-70% of heaviest single from wave sets (focus on perfect reps)
2) Bench press: 2-1-1-1 building
3a) DB floor press: 4x :30 challenging weight
3b) DB front raise + lateral raise: 4x :30 continuous
4a) Weighted GHD back extension: 3×10
4b) Band pull-apart: 3×25-35

Day 2:
1) Deadlift: 4×4 @ 65-70% of heaviest single from wave sets (focus on perfect reps)
2) Front squat: 2-1-1-1 building
3a) DB/KB step-ups: 4x :30 challenging (alternating legs)
3b) Banded/cable tricep press-down @ 20×0: 4×25-30
4) GHD harop curl: 4×10-12

Day 3:
1a) Bamboo bar Bradford press: 4×8-10
1b) Meadows row: 4×6-8 ea arm heavier than last week
2a) Double DB seated strict press: 4x :30 continuous reps
2b) Bicep curl on rings: 4x :30 continuous reps
3) Empty barbell back squat: 4x :30 continuous reps
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
4b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
5) Stretch

WEIGHTLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Snatch: 5×2 heavy across
2) Clean + front squat: 5 sets heavy across
3) Clean-grip deadlift @ 31×1: 4×3 heavier than clean work from today
4) GHD back extensions: 4×10

Day 2:
1) Back squat: 4×4 @ 65-70% of heaviest single from wave sets (focus on perfect reps)
2a) Push press: 4×2 heavier than last week across
2b) Banded/cable tricep press-down @ 20×0: 4×25-30
3) Front squat + jerk, 2+1: 4 sets heavier than last week
4a) DB floor press: 4x :30 challenging weight
4b) DB front raise + lateral raise: 4x :30 continuous
5) GHD harop curl: 4×10-12

Day 3:
1a) Bamboo bar Bradford press: 4×8-10
1b) Meadows row: 4×6-8 ea arm heavier than last week
2a) Double DB seated strict press: 4x :30 continuous reps
2b) Bicep curl on rings: 4x :30 continuous reps
3) Empty barbell back squat: 4x :30 continuous reps
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
4b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
5) Stretch

0
In Blog
Posted

Visualization and Sleep: Enhance Skill Acquisition

Dr. Matthew P. Walker, also known as the Sleep Diplomat, is a professor of neuroscience and psychology at UC Berkeley. In a recent episode of the Joe Rogan Experience podcast (Episode #1109), he discussed the importance of sleep and its effect on learning fine motor skills, solving problems and successfully performing physical tasks. In summary, sleep is an often-overlooked and invaluable tool for increasing performance in many domains. Visualization is another means of accelerating proficiency with fine motor skills and problem-solving; it is a practice that has gained increased traction due to its efficacy in enhancing the performance of athletes, businesspeople and even elite military units in the modern world. How, exactly, are these two things related?

The practice of visualization can take many forms. For the purposes of our discussion, we will refer specifically to visualization practices as they relate to acquiring and mastering new skills. Let’s say that you are a concert musician trying to master a new song on the guitar. While physically practicing is a requisite for learning, the brain is a necessary and crucial player in the equation. What would happen if you spent some time in deep thought, eyes closed, and thought about the finger movements required to perform the song successfully? Some studies have shown that this “mental rehearsal” can be up to 50 percent as effective as physically rehearsing and practicing. The implications of this are astounding: you can actually accelerate the rate at which you learn new skills by simply thinking about them in conjunction with your regular practice.

Elite members of the US military and professional athletes have been using visualization for some time with great success. Former SEAL Commander Mark Divine has written extensively about the use of visualization and breath control as a critical part of training in the SEAL teams. In high-stress situations, these soldiers can operate in a calm and rational manner because they have spent countless hours preparing for these exact combat situations; this preparation involves both physical run-throughs of mission situations and mental rehearsals of the skills and details required for mission success. In a 2014 article in the New York Times, a sports psychologist for the US Olympic Team named Nicole Detling spoke about the use of this practice with Olympic athletes as well. The goal was to make these visualizations as vivid and realistic as possible, encouraging athletes to picture specific events, sights and sounds to bolster their mental rehearsals. For this reason, the term visualization is often replaced with “imagery” to encapsulate the more complete sensory picture these athletes are encouraged to create.

So how, then, does sleep work itself into the equation? When our bodies are sore from intense exercise, it is necessary to “flush” toxins from our blood stream and muscle tissue by performing low-intensity physical activity, stretching and hydrating. This accelerates the recovery process and allows us to attack our next workout with purpose. Wakefulness is considered low-level brain damage in the same way that exercise damages our muscle tissue. In order to flush these built-up toxins out of our brain, the only mechanism that we possess for recovery is sleep. There are some startling statistics related to the adverse health effects of not getting adequate sleep each night, including increased risk of heart disease, increased cancer rates and a higher prevalence of cognitive impairments such as Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Walker suggests that adults get 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night in order to restore homeostasis in the brain and prevent degenerative buildup of these damaging toxins.

In addition to the myriad long-term health benefits of maintaining adequate levels of sleep in our lifetimes, there are some interesting performance-enhancing benefits as well. Neurological studies were conducted on mice attempting to work their way through a maze containing a block of cheese at the finish. The brain activity of the mice was monitored continuously to study the cognitive processes of these animals as they reasoned their way through the puzzle. Upon entering a state of deep sleep later on, the brain activity of the mice was consistent with the activity while they were in the maze. This means that the mice were actively working their way through solutions to the maze while sleeping. While this may not be entirely surprising, the scientists were shocked to discover that the brain activity of the mice during deep sleep was up to 20 times higher than while they were awake. This means that sleep was actually enhancing the neurotransmission in the brains of the mice, allowing them to more effectively solve the maze when they next attempted it. Sleep has been shown to improve deficits in brain activity surrounding fine motor skills and various motor patterns, meaning that it might be one of the most underrated means of performance enhancement currently available to us.

Imagine that you are an athlete preparing for a critical competition or a businessperson preparing for a key presentation in your career. If you set aside time to visualize your performance and your success in these realms, trying to create as vivid an image as possible, and ensure that you follow these visualizations with adequate sleep, then the effects of these two practices can compound. By combining a solid visualization practice with good sleep habits you can noticeably and dramatically increase your performance in a number of activities. How can we develop and foster good sleep habits? For starters, Dr. Walker suggests unplugging at night and avoiding bright screens and technology. Additionally, keeping your bedroom both dark and cool has been shown to increase both quality and quantity of sleep throughout the night. A trick that can help bring your body temperature down is to take a hot shower or bath prior to getting into bed. The hot water actually draws heat out of the body, bringing your core temperature down and allowing you to fall asleep faster. Start to incorporate these techniques in conjunction with a consistent visualization practice and reap the positive benefits of this formidable duo!

Until next time.

=====

For those curious on Dr. Walker’s work, I highly encourage you to listen to Episode #1109 of the Joe Rogan Experience. Additionally, you can visit Dr. Walker’s website, The Sleep Diplomat, here.

0

Lifting Programs: Week of 4.30.18

Week of 4.30.18

POWERLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Back squat: 5×5 @ 60-65% of heaviest single from wave sets (focus on perfect reps)
2) Bench press: 3-2-1-1 building
3a) DB floor press: 4x :30 challenging weight
3b) DB standing Arnold press + overhead hold, 10 + 20s: 4 sets
4a) Weighted GHD back extension: 3×10
4b) Band pull-apart: 3×25-35

Day 2:
1) Deadlift: 5×5 @ 60-65% of heaviest single from wave sets (focus on perfect reps)
2) Front squat: 3-2-1-1 building
3a) Double DB/KB front rack wall sit: 4x :30 heavy
3b) Banded/cable tricep press-down @ 20×0: 4×25-30
4) GHD harop curl: 4×10-12

Day 3:
1a) Bamboo bar Bradford press: 4×8-10
1b) Meadows row: 4×8-10 ea arm heavier than last week
2a) Double DB seated strict press: 4x :30 continuous reps
2b) Bicep curl on rings: 4x :30 continuous reps
3) Double KB front rack squat + reverse lunge ea leg: 3×4-6 heavier than last week
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
4b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
5) Stretch

WEIGHTLIFTING
Day 1:
1) Snatch pull + snatch: 5 sets heavy across
2) Clean pull + clean: 5 sets heavy across
3) Clean-grip deadlift @ 31×1: 4×3 heavier than clean work from today
4) GHD back extensions: 4×10

Day 2:
1) Back squat: 5×5 @ 60-65% of heaviest single from wave sets (focus on perfect reps)
2a) Push press: 4×3 heavier than last week across
2b) Banded/cable tricep press-down @ 20×0: 4×25-30
3) Front squat + jerk, 3+1: 4 sets heavier than last week
4a) DB floor press: 4x :30 challenging weight
4b) DB standing Arnold press + overhead hold, 10 + 20s: 4 sets
5) GHD harop curl: 4×10-12

Day 3:
1a) Bamboo bar Bradford press: 4×8-10
1b) Meadows row: 4×8-10 ea arm heavier than last week
2a) Double DB seated strict press: 4x :30 continuous reps
2b) Bicep curl on rings: 4x :30 continuous reps
3) Double KB front rack squat + reverse lunge ea leg: 3×4-6 heavier than last week
4a) Single arm plank on rings: 4x :15-:20 ea (scale to regular ring plank for :30-:45)
4b) Russian twist on GHD (weighted or unweighted): 4×20
5) Stretch

0

Start typing and press Enter to search